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The Pagani Haurya

After 14 years as the auto industry’s House of Fabergé, Pagani Automobili has built the paltry sum of 132 cars, just shy of Ferrari’s output every two weeks. Most are the original Zonda, with just 10 of the new, U.S.-bound Huayras yet in existence. Judging from the interrogations we received while stuck behind a massive wreck on the autostrada only 10 minutes from Pagani’s Modena, Italy, headquarters, that’s not enough to sear the brand into the consciousness of the locals, who are accustomed to seeing Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, and Ducati test vehicles tearing up their streets.



pagani-huayra-geneva-auto-show-3And it isn’t just the beguiling movement of the Huayra’s motorized body surfaces that constantly lift and tuck like an F-16’s flaperons with the goal of reducing body roll and stopping distances. Or the  720-hp, 6.0-liter twin-turbo V-12, the old single-cam three-valver from the s65, custom built for Pagani by Mercedes-Benz AMG and anodized to a gilded fare-thee-well to resemble the Ark of the Covenant. Or even the cockpit with its bionic-Bauhaus sculptures in cut aluminum that make the driver feel like Lucky Starr chasing the Pirates of the Asteroids.


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What really makes the Huayra startling is that all of its highly cultivated (and, in some cases, efficaciously questionable) flair pulls together to make a stupendous road car. The level of lateral grip, the triple-digit stability, and the braking and steering control give this Beaux-Arts glamour boat the muscle to mix it up with the cars from Brand F and Brand L. Think Le Mans prototype with carpeting and license-plate mounts.

You feel comfortable in the Huayra. You can see out of it. Even if the gauges with their finely etched numerals aren’t easy to read in daylight, you are going fast very quickly, probing the lofty limits of the chassis’ relentless neutrality as the super-boosted Benz V-12 wheeze-bangs through each terrifying, scenery-smearing blast. This is not an exotic that is best hung on a wall—though it would nicely adorn just about any living room.

pagani-huayra-engine-14What the Pagani lacks is the feral mechanical bray that has long been the battle cry of Italy and is still available from the Lamborghini Aventador’s 8000-rpm naturally aspirated V-12. Sure, in a tunnel you’ll scare the pants off any nearby Andean highlanders by sounding like their wind god, Huayra-tata, after stepping on a tack. But for the occupants, with the car’s intake ducts making obscene sucking noises just a few inches behind the cabin, it’s like being two boogers riding in a cheetah’s nostrils.

The Pagani’s seven-speed sequential transmission, nestled transversely behind the differential to allow the engine to be mounted closer to the rear wheels, is of the older-school single-clutch variety. Pagani says the box, built by racing supplier Xtrac, saves about 200 pounds over a dual-clutch, a critical difference considering the transmission’s location. But it does so at the cost of slightly longer upshifts and lagging torque holes at town speeds. Stomp it and you get a downshift with all the subtlety and finesse of a refrigerator tipping over. The company says it’s still tuning the software.

The real reason to buy Mr. Pagani’s Huayra is that it’s the product of a maniacally obsessed perfectionist who plies his craft in aluminum and carbon fiber the way other artists work in watercolor or bronze. Everywhere you look on an unpainted Huayra body, for example, the carbon-fiber weave patterns mate perfectly, whether it’s in a herringbone pattern down the spine or, most impressively, across the air gaps between the doors and the body.

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R&D director Andrea Galletti, who for some years punched a clock on Ferrari’s F1 team, showed me acceleration traces from a test car that indicate 3.3 seconds for 60-mph and lateral acceleration through a constant-radius corner of 1.5 g’s. Of course, it’s not a valid performance number until it’s recorded by our equipment, but from the data, it’s clear that more work is needed in the launch control and the 1-2 upshift, where the acceleration line droops painfully.

R&D director Andrea Galletti, who for some years punched a clock on Ferrari’s F1 team, showed me acceleration traces from a test car that indicate 3.3 seconds for 60-mph and lateral acceleration through a constant-radius corner of 1.5 g’s. Of course, it’s not a valid performance number until it’s recorded by our equipment, but from the data, it’s clear that more work is needed in the launch control and the 1-2 upshift, where the acceleration line droops painfully.

Specifications :

1) VEHICLE TYPE: mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive, 2-passenger, 2-door coupe

2) BASE PRICE: $1,070,500

3) ENGINE TYPE: twin-turbocharged and intercooled SOHC 36-valve V-12, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

4) Displacement: 365 cu in, 5980 cc
5) Power: 720 hp @ 5800 rpm
6) Torque: 738 lb-ft @ 2250 rpm

7) TRANSMISSION: 7-speed automated manual

8) DIMENSIONS:
9) Wheelbase: 110.0 in
10) Length: 181.3 in
11) Width: 80.2 in Height: 46.0 in
12) Curb weight: 3200 lb

13) PERFORMANCE (C/D EST):

Zero to 60 mph: 3.0 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 6.4 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 10.9 sec
Top speed: 224 mph

14) PROJECTED FUEL ECONOMY (C/D EST):
EPA city/highway driving: 10/14 mpg

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Aniket Chaudhari
I m Engineering Student From GECA,Aurangabad.
Aniket Chaudhari

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